DEIMOS-REMUS


100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #8

Charles Dana Gibson (1867-1944)

Country: United States

Famous for: The Gibson Girl, LIFE, Harper’s Weekly, Scribners, Colliers

Influenced: Andrew Loomis, Alberto Vargas, Gil Elvgren, James Montgomery Flagg

Influenced by: Howard Pyle, Charles Keene, Phil May

Charles Gibson is at the forefront of masters of the medium of Pen & Ink, creating thousands of loose, but controlled ink illustrations for various publications. Gibson is most well known for creating the Gibson Girl, an iconic representation of the attractive, well-to-do, independent woman at the turn of the 20th century. The Gibson Girl became a country-wide phenomenon, and was stamped onto everything from magazines, to dishes and clothing. With the constant profit Gibson made from his creation, he became one of the most monetarily successful commercial illustrators to ever live.

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #7

Alfons Maria Mucha (1860-1939)

Country: Czech Republic

Famous for: Advertisements, Postcards, Designs, Decorative Motifs

Influenced: Psychedelic art, poster art

Influenced by: William Morris and the Arts & Crafts movement

Alfons or Alphonse Mucha was a Czech painter, designer and illustrator. He is known for being the most recognizable artist of the Art Nouveau movement, his work characterized by his decorative motifs, swooping lines, hand-done typography and attractive, classically styled women. His style was considered outdated toward the end of his career by many, but since the 1960s it has gained considerable renewed popularity, influencing design choices in many illustrators and graphic artists’ work to this day. 


100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #6

Frederic Remington (1861-1909)

Country: United States

Famous for: Western life, Cowboys, Native Americans, Landscapes, US Cavalry

Influenced: Charles Marion Russell, Charles Schreyvogel, Frank Frazetta

Influenced by: Charles Rollo Peters, James McNeill Whistler

Frederic Remington was an American painter, Illustrator, Sculptor and Writer that made a career out of his depictions of the American West. Much of what he painted, he painted from direct observation of his subjects. Like Winslow Homer, Harper’s Weekly Magazine sent Remington on commissions to cover different events as an artist-correspondent. Though younger and less-established than many of the other illustrators at the time, Remington gained quick popularity and was a competitor to the era’s most popular artists, such as Howard Pyle, Winslow Homer, and Charles Dana Gibson

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #5

Winslow Homer (1836-1910)

Country: United States

Famous for: Maritime paintings, Civl War illustrations, City life, Harper’s Weekly Magazine

Influenced: Howard Pyle, N.C. Wyeth, Andrew Wyeth, Jamie Wyeth

Influenced by: William Sydney Mount,Eastman Johnson, Thomas Eakins

Winslow Homer was an American painter and illustrator, most well known for his paintings of seascapes, but his other big claim to fame was when he was asked by Harper’s Weekly Magazine to work as a reporter to a degree on the front-lines of the American Civil War. This was before photography had really become popular, as Homer would sketch and paint the soldiers from life, as he saw them. These paintings and drawings would be then published in Harper’s Weekly, so as to give the American public an accurate look at life during wartime. After his work during the war, he would go on to paint images of home-life, and how the war affected it, specifically the lives of women and their changing roles. 

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #4

Thomas Nast (1840-1902)

Country: United States

Famous for: The Republican Elephant, Boss Tweed and Tammany Hall political cartoons, Harper’s Weekly magazine

Influenced: Ron Cobb, Robert Crumb, Edgar Degas, Vincent Van Gogh

Influenced by: Albrecht Durer, Gustave Doré, Honoré Daumier,

Thomas Nast was a political cartoonist and caricaturist, and is considered to be the ‘Father of the American Cartoon.’ His work became the basis for all political cartoons that would follow, and is well known for his subtle brand of dark humor. This is in addition to creating the now iconic Elephant representation for the Republican party and the basis for what became the modern day Santa Claus. Adding onto this still is the fact that the popularity of Nast’s illustrations was widespread enough to influence public perception, political elections and political policy. 

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #3

N.C. Wyeth (1882-1945)

Country: United States

Famous for: Treasure Island, Robinson Crusoe, Robin Hood, Kidnapped, The Last of the Mohicans

Influenced: Andrew Wyeth, Jamie Wyeth, Frank Frazetta

Influenced by: Howard Pyle, Winslow Homer

Newell Convers Wyeth was an American Illustrator, and perhaps Howard Pyle’s most well-known student. Over his long and influential career, Wyeth produced over 3000 paintings and illustrated 112 books, including his magnum opus, a portfolio of paintings done for Robert Louis Stephenson’s classic adventure novel, Treasure Island. Like Gustave Doré’s demons and creatures, NC Wyeth and Howard Pyle’s depictions of Pirates, Buccaneers and Adventurers became the staple images for their respective genres, images that have now become stereotypes. Pyle, Wyeth and Wyeth’s talented family, Including his son Andrew Wyeth and grandson Jamie Wyethhave become collectively known as the Brandywine River Painters, named after the area from which they resided for much of their lives. Much of their original work, including many of NC’s Treasure Island images currently reside in the Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford, PA. I was recently able to give the museum a visit, and the inspiring work there almost had me in tears. I recommend a visit to anyone who can make the trip. 

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #2

Gustave Doré (1832-1883)

Country: France

Famous For: Dante’s Inferno, Milton’s Paradise Lost, Bible Illustrations, Perrault’s Fairy Tales, Don Quixote. 

Influenced: Jean “Moebius” Giraud, Frank Frazetta, Virgil Finlay, Ray Harryhausen

Influenced by: Albrecht Durer, Gustave Courbet

Gustave Doré was a French printmaker, Illustrator, painter and sculptor. He is known for his ultra-detailed engravings, of which he had a crew of engravers to help him with, as his portfolios of images often consisted of hundreds of plates. Doré’s work is still in print to this day in many versions of the books and stories he illustrated, and is accredited with creating many of the now stereotypical images of various demons and monsters. 

I’m going to be putting together a series of blog posts concerning 100 influential and prolific illustrators that I believe every illustrator should know. These will not have any specific order of importance. Most bolded names will be clickable, which will link you to either one of these blog posts, if they happen to be an entry, or will link to a gallery of their work. 

Please REBLOG these posts to get these names out there, known and appreciated!

100 Illustrators that all Illustrators should know: #1

Howard Pyle (1853-1911)

Country: United States

Famous for: The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood, King Arthur, Pirates, Harper’s Weekly

Influenced: N.C. Wyeth, Frank Schoonover, Frank Frazetta, Gil Elvgren, The Red Rose Girls

Influenced by: Albrecht Durer, Winslow Homer

Howard Pyle is considered by many to be the father of American Illustration, and had a long-lasting and prolific career creating illustrations for fantasy and adventure stories. He founded the Howard Pyle School of Illustration Art, later coined the Brandywine School named after the area several of his most well-known students were from. Among his most notable students were N.C. Wyeth and Frank Schoonover. Along with his students, he is considered part of the collective known as the Brandywine River Artists, and his work remains in museums throughout the country. 

frazetta:

phobos-romulus:

Frank Frazetta vs. Mike Hoffman

I recently visited the Frank Frazetta Museum in East Stroudsburg, PA. It was an incredible experience being able to look at the master’s work up close, but even more amazing to listen to the first hand experiences of Frank Jr and his memories of his father.

I was talking to Frank Jr. when the subject of Mike Hoffman came up. For those of you who don’t know, Hoffman has made his career imitating the style Frank Frazetta, everything from painting, drawing, very specific subject matters, and even his signature. Of course, no one imitating Frazetta’s style will ever be better than Frazetta himself. In fact, Frank himself has a good quote to address this:

“Why be a second-rate Frazetta when you be can be a first-rate you?” -Frank Frazetta

Frank Jr, however, let me know that Mike Hoffman had been invited to the gallery years back. Knowing that his own work would never compare to the late master, Mike Hoffman has made a crusade to undermine the work of the actual artist who’s responsible for his own success.

This BS is copied from a blog entry of his, that has since been deleted.

THIRTEEN REASONS WHY I’M BETTER THAN FRANK FRAZETTA

1. When I say I don’t use photographs, I’m not lying.

2. When I say I don’t swipe, I’m not lying.

3. I don’t go around claiming criminals like Richard Nixon were great presidents.

4. I don’t go to Rush Limbaugh for intellectual guidance.

5. I don’t publish art books that have paintings of my wife’s big naked ass in them.

6. When younger artists ask for technical advice, I don’t say “don’t try to be like me”.

7. I don’t build museums to myself in my backyard.

8. I don’t pretend to have invented Art all by myself, ignoring everything that came before.

9. I don’t pretend Hal Foster never existed.

10. Because my ambition and drive is the result of undemonstrative father doesn’t mean I became one myself.

11. When my work inspires others, I take paternal responsibility for it.

12. I don’t fault my kids for not following in my footsteps when I didn’t prepare them for it.

13. I don’t refer to myself as “The Legend”.

I know nothing about the political views of Frazetta, and of course, those points have no relevancy, but according to the personal testimony and remembrances of Frank Jr. regarding his father, none of these insults hold any water. Frank was and is a legend, that much is true, but he was a humble man, didn’t push his kids into his career choice, nor did he berate them for not choosing it,  and saw his wife Ellie as his muse, who loved his paintings and loved to be painted.

This guy is a total hack and fraud, a skilled but unimaginative artist with no respect, and thus totally undeserving of any himself. I don’t want to make the world harder for artists, it’s plenty hard enough, but I want this to get reblogged so people are aware of how terrible this guy is.

Reblogging this to get this information out there, Hoffman is just plain disrespectful to say the least, 

phobos-romulus:

From Carlo Pagulayan
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10203825185804604&set=a.1188562228735.29701.1068690747&type=1&theater
First off, I’m not in the mood to debate anyone on the content of this cover. Is it distasteful and offensive? Of course. But that’s Milo freaking Manara. Blame Marvel for exploiting a genuinely talented artist to flame bait its readers to garner buzz.
For those doing lame and badly done paintovers or misinformed critiques about her anatomy, I present this. Mind you, while 3d models of bodies aren’t the gold standard to measure anatomy from, it clearly shows that the pose, while odd looking, is anatomically sound. And don’t bother critiquing the face, it’s how Manara has been drawing faces for 50 years. It most likely looks weird due to Spider Woman’s atrocious costume design.
You superhero buffs need to take a step back and realize there is an entire world of comics apart from your beloved superhero genre that aren’t generic, mould fitting, convoluted webs of publicity stunts, alternate universes/timelines and badly designed characters. There’s another world out there filled with classically trained illustrators who create interesting memorable characters, coherent stories that are often minimalist, and are rich with vibrant color and texture and varying styles.
Or you can just stay inside your little world and watch roided out dudes and busty chicks in goofy spandex and underpants beat the crap out of each other for 22 pages while simultaneously taking it seriously for some reason. They’ll occasionally die, but don’t worry, they’ll be resurrected two weeks later!
You’ll constantly complain about objectification and act like your superhero comics are the only comics on the planet and still keep buying the same crap from Marvel and DC until you’re broke. Then, you’ll see something different, Foreign perhaps, and chew it out and complain that it doesn’t fit the mould and spout off like an uneducated child about how “this artist doesn’t know what he/she’s doing”, or “this guy clearly knows nothing about anatomy, he/she should look at my high school drawings, he/she might learn a thing or two!”
Stay classy.

(badly) attempting to school a master on anatomy is ridiculous and disrespectful. Manara, while not for everyone, is a master of such, and these paint overs and critiques are complete and utter crap. Besides, it’s a damn comic with goofy characters who are sexualized no matter who they are drawn by, why is Manara getting all the flak for doing his job?Marvel got what they wanted by HIRING A FAMOUS EROTIC COMIC ARTIST FROM EUROPE. 

phobos-romulus:

From Carlo Pagulayan

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10203825185804604&set=a.1188562228735.29701.1068690747&type=1&theater

First off, I’m not in the mood to debate anyone on the content of this cover. Is it distasteful and offensive? Of course. But that’s Milo freaking Manara. Blame Marvel for exploiting a genuinely talented artist to flame bait its readers to garner buzz.

For those doing lame and badly done paintovers or misinformed critiques about her anatomy, I present this. Mind you, while 3d models of bodies aren’t the gold standard to measure anatomy from, it clearly shows that the pose, while odd looking, is anatomically sound. And don’t bother critiquing the face, it’s how Manara has been drawing faces for 50 years. It most likely looks weird due to Spider Woman’s atrocious costume design.

You superhero buffs need to take a step back and realize there is an entire world of comics apart from your beloved superhero genre that aren’t generic, mould fitting, convoluted webs of publicity stunts, alternate universes/timelines and badly designed characters. There’s another world out there filled with classically trained illustrators who create interesting memorable characters, coherent stories that are often minimalist, and are rich with vibrant color and texture and varying styles.

Or you can just stay inside your little world and watch roided out dudes and busty chicks in goofy spandex and underpants beat the crap out of each other for 22 pages while simultaneously taking it seriously for some reason. They’ll occasionally die, but don’t worry, they’ll be resurrected two weeks later!

You’ll constantly complain about objectification and act like your superhero comics are the only comics on the planet and still keep buying the same crap from Marvel and DC until you’re broke. Then, you’ll see something different, Foreign perhaps, and chew it out and complain that it doesn’t fit the mould and spout off like an uneducated child about how “this artist doesn’t know what he/she’s doing”, or “this guy clearly knows nothing about anatomy, he/she should look at my high school drawings, he/she might learn a thing or two!”

Stay classy.

(badly) attempting to school a master on anatomy is ridiculous and disrespectful. Manara, while not for everyone, is a master of such, and these paint overs and critiques are complete and utter crap. Besides, it’s a damn comic with goofy characters who are sexualized no matter who they are drawn by, why is Manara getting all the flak for doing his job?

Marvel got what they wanted by HIRING A FAMOUS EROTIC COMIC ARTIST FROM EUROPE. 

nathanandersonart:

Sneak preview for my month-long project for October. 

nathanandersonart:

Sneak preview for my month-long project for October. 

Moebius Book Collection so far! 

Moebius Book Collection so far! 

patrickleger:

I recently did these postcard designs for a Mr Porter event in St. Tropez, as part of a gift bag promo.

These are completely digital except for a few textures. I’m still trying to bridge that gulf between how I approach traditional media with digital, but I think these came closer than any of the project’s I’ve worked on.

nathanandersonart:

Another World. Lester and his Alien Buddy.

nathanandersonart:

Another World. Lester and his Alien Buddy.

nealdanderson:

I wanted to create a short comic very much in the vein of Moebius and the early issues of Heavy Metal Magazine and its French equivalent, Metal Hurlant. My challenge was to create a full story without any dialogue or exposition. 

So that’s where my proposition starts. I want to create a kind of anthology magazine, but one that’s totally made of wordless comics. So please, REBLOG and get this spread around, as I want to start gathering talent in the independent comic realm to help contribute to this idea. If it gets big enough, I may even start some kind of kickstarter and propose the idea to bigger publishers!